Are you worried about breast cancer? Nuffield Health Leicester Hospital, continue to develop its Rapid Access Breast Care Clinic in the East Midlands

Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in the UK, affecting almost 55,000 women and approximately 350 men each year. However, a lump is not necessarily a sign that you have breast cancer. Roughly 80%* of lumps in a woman’s breast is caused by benign non-cancerous changes, cysts, or other conditions. If you find a lump, don’t panic – but you should have it checked just to be sure.

At Nuffield Health Leicester Hospital, we understand that if you, notice a change to your breasts that you will want answers quickly. That’s why we have developed our – Weekly Rapid Access Breast Clinic.

Breast cancer myths

There are many myths about breast cancer and sometimes hard to tell fact from fiction:

Most breast lumps are cancerous.

A lump is not necessarily a sign that you have cancer. Roughly 80% of lumps in women’s breasts are non-cancerous.

Breast cancer always comes in the form of a lump.

Many women examining their breast incorrectly believe they should be looking exclusively for lumps. There are other changes to look out for such as changes in the breast skin,swelling, skin irritation or dimpling.

If you’re at risk for breast cancer, there’s little you can do but watch for the signs.

There is a lot that a woman can do to lower their risk, including maintaining a normal healthy weight, regular exercise, lowering alcohol consumption, stop smoking and examining their breasts regularly.

For more information about breast care and how Nuffield can help please visit nuffieldhealth.com/article/breast-cancer-myths-busted or call 0116 298 6787 to book into the Rapid Access Breast Clinic today.


Our breast clinics are led by one of our Consultant Breast Surgeons and are supported by a team of  specialist breast care nurses and radiographers.

To aid diagnostics and treatment Nuffield Health Leicester Hospital is equipped with the latest digital mammography and reporting equipment, and in November 2017 we were delighted to announce the further investment in a “Sentinel Node Biopsy Machine” to enhance our services and to improve treatment for our patients.

Miss Monika Kaushik, Consultant Breast and Oncoplastic Surgeon, specialising in breast cancer, said: “Sentinel nodes are the first nodes that may be subject to the spread of cancer of the breast. This investment in the biopsy equipment will allow us to find the sentinel node (nodes) during breast cancer surgery to check for the spread of cancer and help with decision making for further treatment.”

The Rapid Access Breast Clinic is held weekly. There is no need to wait, contact us today on 0116 298 6787 for our next available appointment.

“ Our continued investment in new technology and in specialist nursing staff to support our Consultant Breastcare Team enables us to provide the best possible clinical diagnosis, care and treatment. Our weekly rapid access breast clinic is unique to Leicestershire providing women and men with fast convenient access to our specialists.”
Tony Yates, Hospital Director.

What happens during the visit to the rapid access breast clinic?

”During your visit, you will initially be seen by one of our consultant breast surgeons, who will perform a breast examination in the presence of one of our BreastCare Nurses. This will enable the consultant to determine which diagnostic test/s will be most appropriate to obtain an accurate diagnosis that day. You can expect to be with us for up to 2 hours during your visit.”
Rebecca Mushambi, Radiology Manager at Nuffield Health Leicester Hospital.


Rapid access breast clinic

Nuffield Health Leicester Hospital has developed a rapid access breast clinic that is accessible to men and women whether you have private medical insurance or just want to pay for this service as a one-off.

This clinic is run bi-weekly on a Wednesday evening and every Friday evening from 17:30 – 20:00.

To book please call 0116 298 6938. All you need is a referral letter from your GP.

*Source: Breast Cancer UK

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